Tag Archives: college

Congresswoman Edwards’ 7th Annual College & Career Fair Provides Insight, Youth Resources

For the seventh year, Maryland Congresswoman Donna F. Edwards hosted her annual College and Career Fair for students in Maryland. The event, held at Annapolis High School in Anne Arundel County, MD on Saturday, October 10th, drew more than 1,500 high school, middle school, and college students and their parents.

Representatives more than 100 schools, companies, nonprofit organizations shared resources with students to provide college resources and answer questions, exhibitors gave tips on essay writing, financing education, and requirements for students seeking to attend participating colleges and universities. Many of these institutions of higher learning also conducted on-site interviews, and had alumni representatives who shared their perspectives on the college experience with students.

Photo credit: Congresswoman Donna Edwards Staff
Photo credit: Congresswoman Donna Edwards Staff

In addition, students received career resources to help them plan for future opportunities, learn more about internships, and identify important skills needed for jobs – STEM and beyond – and how they can begin developing them now. Ask The Strategist owner and Editor, Kesi Stribling (CEO of KSG Strategic Consulting), participated as an exhibitor for the fifth time. She shared the Career Development Checklist covering action items for students in middle school, high school, and college and the Three Es of Career Preparation.

The fair featured workshops to assist students in their academic and career pursuits, including SAT & ACT Information Sessions, Exploring STEM Careers, Financial Aid Resources for Post-High School Education, and It’s Never Too Late to Think About College.

A snapshot of participating exhibitors include AmeriCorps, Anne Arundel Community College, Bennett College, Lockheed Martin, Morgan State University STEM Expo, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation, Patriots Technology Training Center, State Farm Insurance, Tufts University, and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

For more information about Congresswoman Edwards’ College and Career Fair, visit her website or follow #RepEdwardsCollegeFair.

DISCLAIMER: Since its original debut on MySpace in 2004 as Midweek Musings, ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. All content, unless otherwise noted, is the property of Ask the Strategist and its affiliates, and may not be re-published without express written permission from the Editor.

New Country, New Lens

Posted by Delise Hampton

This is the first post of Ms. Hampton’s South Africa series on Ask The Strategist, which highlights her acclimation to the new country, and focus on international issues, diversity, economics, and life as a student abroad.

Every day has been beautiful since my arrival. The shadow of Table Mountain in my periphery, and the sun smiling onto the crystals of sweat on my forehead, make each day beautiful in Cape Town, South Africa. It is the type of natural beauty that makes me wonder just how this lush landscape was turned upside down by apartheid. The effects of the forced separation still linger in the streets of South Africa, inevitably reminding me of the United States of America, where, although, we tend to act as if we dwell in a post-racial society, there is still work to be done. The revelation of this similarity between the United States and South Africa has helped me to identify the many cultural and historical elements that make both countries unique, yet somewhat the same.

Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town
Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town

 

Besides the fact that South Africans drive on the opposite side of the road, the structure of Cape Town, with its skyscrapers and fancy hotels, reminds me of home. Despite the luxurious surroundings, Cape Town also has an impoverished community. These communities are given the name townships, which are synonymous to the word “ghetto” in the United States; however, the conditions and historical contexts behind their developments are quite different. Being neither worse nor better, the struggle for bare necessities is where the common thread meets.

Cape Town's beauty inspires the writer.
Cape Town’s beauty inspires the writer.

Recently, I visited Langa Township, which is where primarily Black South Africans reside, who were forcibly removed from their homes during apartheid and relocated to other areas. The most apparent difference, when compared to America, is just how much each household structure in the township made a statement about the economic status of those who lived there. One home mirrored an affluent family, while the neighboring home represented the complete opposite. The economic disparity within Cape Town is visibly present where it seems as though there is no middle ground – either you are filthy rich or dirt poor.

The author absorbing the local culture in South Africa.
The writer  absorbing the local culture in South Africa.

In retrospect, the beauty of it all is that Cape Town’s natives are just as beautiful as the natural scenery that surrounds them, without regard to their shade, shape, or size. An international onlooker like myself could not be more privileged to be immersed in such a diverse culture. Hopefully, in the months that I am here, I will have to chance to understand and contribute to Cape Town as a citizen of the world, while helping fellow local citizens in their struggles to advance. In essence, the similarities and differences between home and Cape Town help me personalize my experience abroad and acclimate to this new environment, realizing that the similarities outweigh the differences.

About the Blogger: Delise Hampton

Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town
Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Guest Blogger Delise Hampton grew up in a very modest home, with four siblings and her mother as the sole provider of the necessities. No stranger to hardships, one of the most memorable experience was that of Hurricane Katrina. Delise was only ten years old, but she never let this hold her back, and the experience firmed her resolve to maximize every moment. Currently matriculating at Howard University, Delise is a  strong-willed, positive, and curious young lady, whose primary goal in life is to affect change in the world, one country, city, or region at a time.

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.

Four Crucial Factors in Getting a Job

When it comes to getting an internship or a job, don’t rely on others to get you there. I hear it on campus all the time: “The career center isn’t helpful at all.” “Nobody’s really interested in helping me.” “The right support systems aren’t in place.”

Often, it seems as though paying college tuition and getting the diploma are legitimate reasons to have a job or an internship handed to you on a silver platter.  In reality, opportunity presents itself when you’ve put in the work.  Here’s a starter guide to getting what you want when it comes to finding professional opportunities that are right for you.

Work Backwards

Many of us don’t know what the next step is that will ensure that we get where we want to be professionally.  I find that the best way to ensure success is to work backwards.  Find something that interests you.  Find a career that incorporates your interests, and work backwards from there.  Law school or Master’s degree?  Start getting experience and build your resume.  You can never start too soon.

Network

Buy some business cards and make use of them.  If you are in college or grad school, your career center should print business cards for you with the school logo on them.  If not, Vista Print does incredibly inexpensive sets of business cards.  Take them to events are start talking to people.  Don’t be afraid to talk to people in unconventional places.  Once, a conversation in a grocery store led to an opportunity for me.  If someone is interesting to you (even if they are not in your target career field), give them your card.  You never know where a connection will lead you.  If someone gives you a business card, get in touch with them – they gave it to you for a reason.  Handwritten notes, in addition to emailing, aren’t overdoing it – and they make a big impression on the person with whom you’ve networked.

Dress for the part

Buy at least one classic, good quality professional outfit.  Nothing too noticeable – you’re going to have to wear it to multiple events.  You don’t want an obvious outfit repeat but you want to look professional every time you will be seen by people who can help you go places.

Related content: Check out our professional career attire board on Pinterest

Don’t rely on others for your own success

The college career services office will only get you so far.  After you’ve revised your resume and have learned how to write a cover letter, it’s the face- to-face encounters that will take where you want to be.  Always present yourself as polite, enthusiastic, and professional.  This can be tough when you feel discouraged, but employers want to hire people that are pleasant to be around. Ask your friends to introduce you to their connections.  Get off campus or out of your own apartment.

So put on a smile, get out there, and make a difference for yourself!

About the Blogger: Maddy Marshall

MMarshallHS

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.