Category Archives: Youth

The HU Alumni Association Highlights its 50th Anniversary on The Strategy Sessions

Founded in 1867, Howard University, located in Washington, DC, is noted for its academics, published professors, civil rights activism, and global reach. Notable alumni span the professional, entertainment, and civic landscapes, including actresses Phylicia Rashad and Taraji P. Henson; entertainment mogul Sean Combs; and, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed. While alumni activities date back to the 1800s, this year the Howard University Alumni AssociationHoward University Alumni Association (HUAA) marks its 50th Anniversary as a part of the University’s Charter.

Leadership from HUAA and the anniversary celebration are guests on the next episode of The Strategy Sessions radio show. They will highlight anniversary events planned to entertain, educate, and empower alumni, students, and supporters, including the anniversary membership drive, summer fundraiser, and Bison on the Vineyard event on Martha’s Vineyard.

 

WHO:

Kesi Stribling, Host of The Strategy Sessions radio show

Chris Washington, HUAA President

Keith Benn, HUAA 50th Anniversary Steering Committee Chairperson

Andrea Hodge, Vice President, JP Morgan Chase and speaker during the career program on Martha’s Vineyard

WHAT:         

The Strategy Sessions radio show

Episode: The Howard University Alumni Association Marks its 50th Anniversary

WHEN:

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (EST)

LISTEN:        Listen LIVE on http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thestrategysessions, or download the podcast on iTunes. Follow the live chat on Facebook.

Listeners may call (347) 539-5143 to speak with our guests, or post questions on http://www.facebook.com/TheStrategySessions. Follow the conversation on Twitter using #TheStrategySessions.

ONLINE LINKS

Howard University Alumni Association Website

HUAA Anniversary Website

HUAA on Twitter

HUAA on Facebook

 

ABOUT THE STRATEGY SESSIONS

Originally an occasional webinar with business leaders in 2005, The Strategy Sessions has evolved into a respected radio show on BlogTalkRadio featuring top strategists in business, entrepreneurship, careers, youth, women’s issues, community, and health. The show airs live on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 11:00 a.m. ET, and is hosted by career, marketing, and business strategist, Kesi Stribling. One of 300 featured hosts of the more than 16,000 shows on BlogTalkRadio, Kesi employs her hallmark interviewing style to cultivate innovative and engaging conversations with guests, including the U.S. Small Business Administration, AAA, Ladies America, LifeLock, American Express, DC Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, the American Heart Association, Lockheed Martin, and Internships.com. For more information, or to download the podcast, visit http://www.blogtalkradio.com/TheStrategySessions.

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.

New Country, New Lens

Posted by Delise Hampton

This is the first post of Ms. Hampton’s South Africa series on Ask The Strategist, which highlights her acclimation to the new country, and focus on international issues, diversity, economics, and life as a student abroad.

Every day has been beautiful since my arrival. The shadow of Table Mountain in my periphery, and the sun smiling onto the crystals of sweat on my forehead, make each day beautiful in Cape Town, South Africa. It is the type of natural beauty that makes me wonder just how this lush landscape was turned upside down by apartheid. The effects of the forced separation still linger in the streets of South Africa, inevitably reminding me of the United States of America, where, although, we tend to act as if we dwell in a post-racial society, there is still work to be done. The revelation of this similarity between the United States and South Africa has helped me to identify the many cultural and historical elements that make both countries unique, yet somewhat the same.

Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town
Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town

 

Besides the fact that South Africans drive on the opposite side of the road, the structure of Cape Town, with its skyscrapers and fancy hotels, reminds me of home. Despite the luxurious surroundings, Cape Town also has an impoverished community. These communities are given the name townships, which are synonymous to the word “ghetto” in the United States; however, the conditions and historical contexts behind their developments are quite different. Being neither worse nor better, the struggle for bare necessities is where the common thread meets.

Cape Town's beauty inspires the writer.
Cape Town’s beauty inspires the writer.

Recently, I visited Langa Township, which is where primarily Black South Africans reside, who were forcibly removed from their homes during apartheid and relocated to other areas. The most apparent difference, when compared to America, is just how much each household structure in the township made a statement about the economic status of those who lived there. One home mirrored an affluent family, while the neighboring home represented the complete opposite. The economic disparity within Cape Town is visibly present where it seems as though there is no middle ground – either you are filthy rich or dirt poor.

The author absorbing the local culture in South Africa.
The writer  absorbing the local culture in South Africa.

In retrospect, the beauty of it all is that Cape Town’s natives are just as beautiful as the natural scenery that surrounds them, without regard to their shade, shape, or size. An international onlooker like myself could not be more privileged to be immersed in such a diverse culture. Hopefully, in the months that I am here, I will have to chance to understand and contribute to Cape Town as a citizen of the world, while helping fellow local citizens in their struggles to advance. In essence, the similarities and differences between home and Cape Town help me personalize my experience abroad and acclimate to this new environment, realizing that the similarities outweigh the differences.

About the Blogger: Delise Hampton

Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town
Guest Blogger, Delise Hampton, in Cape Town

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Guest Blogger Delise Hampton grew up in a very modest home, with four siblings and her mother as the sole provider of the necessities. No stranger to hardships, one of the most memorable experience was that of Hurricane Katrina. Delise was only ten years old, but she never let this hold her back, and the experience firmed her resolve to maximize every moment. Currently matriculating at Howard University, Delise is a  strong-willed, positive, and curious young lady, whose primary goal in life is to affect change in the world, one country, city, or region at a time.

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.

Choosing the Right Mentor

The only way to give a good opinion is to validate it through experience.  A good opinion can be on any subject – life, art, style, politics, and projects.  But as young people, we have limited experience in any of these fields.  So look to a mentor, someone who knows the ropes, to help as a kind of unofficial coach.

Recently, in class, a student commented, “Find a professor who knows a lot about what you want to learn and ask them about it.  People love to talk about what their passions.” Even though this suggestion is one critical part of finding a mentor, it signals the bigger lesson: finding a mentor is a highly personal process. Thus, there are no set rules, no template, for doing so.

Despite the personalized approach to choosing the right mentor, there are some common denominators in what makes a good mentor:

  •  Identify someone with whom you can speak frequently
  • Select someone whose lifestyle you admire
  • Watch how they conduct themselves – remember they have experienced what you are experiencing
  • When you find someone who inspires you, look up to them.  There is no more special an experience than your relationship with your mentor.

Related: January is National Mentoring Month!

About the Blogger: Maddy Marshall

Maddy Marshall, Guest Blogger
Maddy Marshall, Guest Blogger

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.

Four Crucial Factors in Getting a Job

When it comes to getting an internship or a job, don’t rely on others to get you there. I hear it on campus all the time: “The career center isn’t helpful at all.” “Nobody’s really interested in helping me.” “The right support systems aren’t in place.”

Often, it seems as though paying college tuition and getting the diploma are legitimate reasons to have a job or an internship handed to you on a silver platter.  In reality, opportunity presents itself when you’ve put in the work.  Here’s a starter guide to getting what you want when it comes to finding professional opportunities that are right for you.

Work Backwards

Many of us don’t know what the next step is that will ensure that we get where we want to be professionally.  I find that the best way to ensure success is to work backwards.  Find something that interests you.  Find a career that incorporates your interests, and work backwards from there.  Law school or Master’s degree?  Start getting experience and build your resume.  You can never start too soon.

Network

Buy some business cards and make use of them.  If you are in college or grad school, your career center should print business cards for you with the school logo on them.  If not, Vista Print does incredibly inexpensive sets of business cards.  Take them to events are start talking to people.  Don’t be afraid to talk to people in unconventional places.  Once, a conversation in a grocery store led to an opportunity for me.  If someone is interesting to you (even if they are not in your target career field), give them your card.  You never know where a connection will lead you.  If someone gives you a business card, get in touch with them – they gave it to you for a reason.  Handwritten notes, in addition to emailing, aren’t overdoing it – and they make a big impression on the person with whom you’ve networked.

Dress for the part

Buy at least one classic, good quality professional outfit.  Nothing too noticeable – you’re going to have to wear it to multiple events.  You don’t want an obvious outfit repeat but you want to look professional every time you will be seen by people who can help you go places.

Related content: Check out our professional career attire board on Pinterest

Don’t rely on others for your own success

The college career services office will only get you so far.  After you’ve revised your resume and have learned how to write a cover letter, it’s the face- to-face encounters that will take where you want to be.  Always present yourself as polite, enthusiastic, and professional.  This can be tough when you feel discouraged, but employers want to hire people that are pleasant to be around. Ask your friends to introduce you to their connections.  Get off campus or out of your own apartment.

So put on a smile, get out there, and make a difference for yourself!

About the Blogger: Maddy Marshall

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DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.